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Schedule

Registration is open for the 2017 conference, to be held online July 20-21, between 12-5pm Eastern. 

Our 2017 schedule is now available below. Once you register for the conference, we’ll be in touch via email a week before the conference with further details.


2017 4T DATA LITERACY CONFERENCE | JULY 20 – 21, 2017


Thursday, July 20, noon – 1pm Eastern
DataRefuge
Justin Schell, University of Michigan Library’s Shapiro Design Lab
Schell will discuss the origins and continued efforts of the DataRefuge movement. Born out of fears of widespread removal of environmental and other governmental data that citizens and corporations alike rely on, DataRefuge has assisted in coordinating more than 40 “Data Rescue” events, bringing together librarians, developers, scientists, archivists, and other concerned citizens to archive a variety of federal data. The project has evolved into a multi-field conversation about the importance, and uneven vulnerability of, data. One of the main lessons of this project is the variety of ways that people can get involved in such preservation efforts. Schell will discuss a number of ways that participants and their students can assist in the project.
Moderator: Jo Angela Oehrli
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/epMBxh

Thursday, July 20, 1:15 – 2:15pm Eastern
Tools for Preserving Your Personal and Intellectual Privacy
Wendy Stephens, Jacksonville State University
Have you ever searched for something out of idle curiosity only to have targeted advertisements follow you around online?  How can you  combat the ever-increasing number of corporate entities looking to scrap your (and your students) online browsing information? This session will explore a range of tools to preserve your privacy, including TOR, Ghostery, DuckDuckGo, StartPage, and HTTPS Everywhere, with practical and low-effort options for preserving your personal privacy while maintaining the spirit of inquiry.
Moderator: Jo Angela Oehrli
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/Tofe6H

Thursday, July 20, 2:30 – 3:30pm Eastern
The Right to Obscurity vs. The Digital Eye of Sauron
Susan D. Ballard, Granite State College
In Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings,  the Eye of Sauron, was able to surveille the unsuspecting inhabitants of Middle Earth and using the information he gathered, subject them to his will.  As we learned, it was left to Hobbits -rather shy, retiring sorts – to finally set things right and thwart his evil intentions! This session will focus on the how the use of data has made it almost impossible for the average person to maintain a low profile in a high tech world.  While we value the ability to connect with friends and colleagues via social media and use eCommerce  with increasing regularity, do we want those interactions and transactions monitored, collected and used to scrutinize and manipulate our lives?  Conversely, has the ability for us to also easily access data and information about others turned us into opportunists who “hack” into other people’s personal spaces, or even worse, do we exhibit voyeuristic tendencies and a lack of empathy for others by secretly invading their privacy. What would a hobbit do? We’ll discuss strategies to guard your right to obscurity and be more understanding of the need to appreciate this right for others, too.  
Moderator: Jo Angela Oehrli
Session Link:
coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/or53ab

Thursday, July 20, 3:45 – 4:45pm Eastern
Using Social Explorer to Help Students Gain Insight
Justin Joque, University of Michigan Library
Helping students gain context for data can be a challenge. But SocialExplorer.com, which has both free and paid features, can unlock insights by mapping data to a U.S. Map. There’s nothing to download — the project is browser-based. Because it has many historical data sets from the U.S. Census and similar sources, and a variety of styles for visualizing data, students spend less time tinkering and more time analyzing data. We will cover both how to export tables and create maps using the built in tools in Social Explorer. We will pay especially close attention to the visualization and mapping options and discuss possible ways to integrate Social Explorer into assignments. Come learn some strategies from U-M’s data visualization librarian for how you can use this tool to scaffold students’ data explorations and reveal new insights.
Moderator: Jo Angela Oehrli
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/zAi6Yi

FRIDAY, JULY 21
Friday, July 21, noon – 1pm Eastern
Science in the Wild: How to make the most of Citizen Science Projects at your School
Debbie Abilock, NoodleTools; Susan Smith, Harker School; Connie Williams, Petaluma High School
Abilock, Smith, and Williams invite you explore the many ways that Citizen Science Projects can fit into your classroom in order to build student skills, collaboration, and confidence. Together we will explore the process of incorporating Citizen Science projects into a specific course or curricular area.  We will review university, governmental, and non-profit portals that offer projects, and the pros and cons of the formats and goals. We will also discuss how to discern perspective, identify funding and scientific oversight, and how to best match your curricular objectives to the organization and project.
Moderator: Kristin Fontichiaro
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/LrJSeG

Friday, July 21, 1:15 – 2:15pm Eastern
Big Data And You
Jole Seroff, Castilleja School
You may have heard of Big Data, the process of collecting millions of pieces of data and drawing conclusions from them. In this session, Seroff will engage participants in interactive conversations about choices you can actively make about your own privacy in the world of Big Data.
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/qCWFds

Friday, July 21, 2:30 – 3:30pm Eastern
Student data privacy: Protecting the personal information that informs instruction
Jennifer Colby, Huron High School, Ann Arbor, MI
Using student data to develop and inform school curricula and classroom instruction is useful and effective, but we need to weigh the benefits of using this data for school improvement with the dangers of exposing students’ personal information. If we understand student data privacy we can be better stewards of our students’ personal information.
Moderator: Kristin Fontichiaro
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/dA1jXj

Friday, July 21, 3:45 – 4:45pm Eastern
Databasic.io: Tools & activities that help introduce newcomers to data storytelling
Catherine d’Ignazio and Samantha Viotty, Emerson College Engagement Lab
There has been a proliferation of tools created to assist novices in gathering, working with, and visualizing data. The problem is that many of these tools prioritize creating flashy pictures without scaffolding a learning process for newcomers to data analysis and storytelling. In this talk, we showcase the motivations behind creating the free, online platform Databasic.io. We will demo the tools and activities that Databasic offers as well as discuss the learning goals that they fulfill.
Moderator: Kristin Fontichiaro
Session Link: coming July 19
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/zvna5g

 

 

 


(((SUMMER 2016 CONFERENCE INFORMATION IS ARCHIVED BELOW))


Schedule at a Glance (For a detailed schedule with session descriptions, please click here.)

THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2016
Time (Eastern) Session Title Presenter
9:00 – 10:15am “But It’s a Number, So It Has To Be True!”: An Introduction to Data Literacy, Part I
(LINK TO ARCHIVED SESSION; EVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOCSLIDE DECK)
Lynette Hoelter
10:30 – 11:30am Where The Rubber Meets the Road: Data Literacy in the Content Areas
(LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDING; EVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC w/LINK TO SLIDE DECK)
Jennifer Colby
12:00 – 1:00pm Information Literacy Includes Data Literacy! (LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDINGEVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC #1; GOOGLE DOC #2; SLIDE DECK) Jole Seroff
1:15 – 2:15pm Close Reading:  Unpacking the Impact Language Has on How We Understand Statistics (LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDINGEVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC) Tasha Bergson-Michelson
2:30 – 3:30pm Real World Data Fluency: How to Use Raw Data (LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDING OF SECOND TAKEEVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC; SLIDE DECK)

*Note: due to technical difficulties, we are repeating this session on Friday at 5:30pm.

Wendy Stephens
3:45 – 4:45pm Gathering Data via Action Research: A Plan for Librarians, Classroom Teachers, and Students (LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDINGEVALUATION LINK) Susan Ballard

 

FRIDAY, JULY 15, 2016
Time (Eastern) Session Title Presenter
9:00 – 10:15am “But It’s a Number, So It Has To Be True!”: An Introduction to Data Literacy, Part II
(LINK TO ARCHIVED SESSIONEVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC; SLIDE DECK)
Lynette Hoelter
10:30 – 11:30am Making Sense of Data Visualization
(LINK TO ARCHIVED SESSIONEVALUATION LINK; SLIDE DECK)
Justin Joque
11:30am – noon Break
Noon – 1pm Data Presentation: Showcasing Your Data With Charts and Graphs
(LINK TO ARCHIVED SESSIONEVALUATION LINK; SLIDE DECK)
Tierney Steelberg
1:15 – 2:15pm Data Literacy and Voting
(LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDINGEVALUATION LINK; STUIT)
Martha Stuit
2:30 -5:15pm NOTE: There are two parts to this session; we will announce a 15-minute stretch break after Part I.

Infographics: An Instructional Lens, Part 1: Rationale and Framework for Teaching Infographics
(LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDING; EVALUATION LINK; SLIDE DECK; CONNIE & DEBBIE’S “RECIPE FOR AN INFOGRAPHIC” ARTICLE)

Infographics: An Instructional Lens, Part 2: Understanding the story behind the design (SAME LINKS AS ABOVE!)

Connie Williams, Debbie Abilock, & Susan Smith
 5:30 – 6:30
Real World Data Fluency: How to Use Raw Data (LINK TO ARCHIVED RECORDINGEVALUATION LINK; GOOGLE DOC; SLIDE DECK)
Wendy Stephens

 

For a detailed 2016 schedule, please click here.