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Schedule

Ready to register? Click here — it’s free and will give you access to live or archived sessions.

Comments from 2017 attendees:
“Truly this is been one of the best conferences I have attended.”
“Every single session in this conference has been outstanding! I have learned so much and have so much to explore with all of the resources being shared.”
“Thank you for hosting such a spectacular group of presenters!”
“I was blown away by the content.”

Looking for sessions from 2016-2017? Click here and, to use those webinars as PD in your own libary, school, or community, check out the discussion questions and activities in Part I of the book Data Literacy in the Real World: Conversations and Case Studies, available as a free PDF, Amazon eBook, or print book.

Check back in the days leading up to the conference for links to access the sessions.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

12:00 – 1:00pm Eastern
Learning Data Science at the Library: Lesson Plans on Data Literacy Skills
Charissa Jefferson, California State University-Northridge
Diego Mendez-Carbajo, Illinois Wesleyan University
Katrina Stierholz, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Moderated by Kristin Fontichiaro, University of Michigan School of Michigan
You probably have heard that in April the unemployment rate in the U.S. was the lowest since the year 2000. But, do you know if it was higher than the unemployment rate in your State? How can you answer that question? In order to present the quantitative information needed to make an effective argument we need to apply a wide range of data literacy skills. From searching strategically to using visualization strategies that facilitate analysis, abstract data literacy skills can be articulated into concrete knowledge practices through hands-on lesson plans. This webinar describes the elements of a lesson plan focused on data literacy. Join the conversation and contribute your own instructional ideas!
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/fptvzRaGS4yoq2RH3

1:15 – 2:15pm Eastern
All About You, Up For Sale: How Data Brokers Like Cambridge Analytica Construct Consumer Identities
Wendy Steadman Stephens, Jacksonville State University
Moderated by Lynette Hoelter, ICPSR
When revelations about political operatives leveraging profiles and connections scraped from Facebook grabbed headlines this spring, the use of personal and demographic information has long determined everything from the mail order catalogs homes receive to the prices listed in those catalogs. Beyond targeting advertising, collocation of these types of information points can have long-term ramifications for our health, wealth and security. Track the evolution of increasingly sophisticated prediction models, consider how the data we share determines how we are marketed to, and increase your personal agency when it comes to data sharing.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/LF7hX9f5aQyo2Gkg1

2:45 – 3:45pm Eastern
Maps, Graphs, and More Oh My!: Reading and Evaluating Data Visualizations
Tyler Hoff, University of Michigan School of Information
Moderated by Kristin Fontichiaro, University of Michigan School of Information
Have you ever looked at a graph or infographic, only to realize you had no idea what it was saying? You would be far from the first, or last, person to have that sequence of thoughts. In this presentation we will discuss what makes a good data visualization, what makes an effective one, and tips and tricks for identifying which ones you can rely on and which ones you can’t. First we will discuss those tips and tricks of data visualization design, next look at some real world data visualizations and assess them, and finally discuss how to teach these concepts in an easy and effective manner.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/t8IcZUBG43nHY9QA3

4:00 – 5:00pm Eastern
Exploring Big Issues with Data in Society: Using Case Studies with Students
Kristin Fontichiaro, University of Michigan School of Information
Moderated by Lynette Hoelter, ICPSR
From Facebook to Cambridge Analytica, Nest thermostats to Fitbits, privacy policies to school recordkeeping, kids interact with data and data-based decisions every day. In this session, we’ll look at case studies in the published volume Data Literacy in the Real World: Conversations and Case Studies as teaching tools for facilitating critical conversations with students.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/6ge31tcbodsgz4eE2

THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

12:00 – 1:00pm Eastern
Building Data Literacy Among Students Using the ARDA’s Free Online Resources
Andrew Whitehead, Association of Religion Data Archives
Moderated by Lynette Hoelter, ICPSR
The goal of the Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) is to democratize access to quality data on religion. We serve a broad constituency including students, teachers, researchers, journalists, and religious leaders. Through the years we have created a number of free online tools and resources that allow each of these groups to quickly and easily access data. In this presentation we will explore a number of these resources. By the end, viewers will be able to create a socio-demographic profile of their community using Census data in seconds, access profiles and data for over 200 nations around the world, and examine dozens of learning exercises that build students’ online data research skills. We will also share steps the ARDA is taking to make our data and resources even more user-friendly.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/6aafFYpd9UvcKn8C3

 

1:15 – 2:15pm Eastern
Practical obscurity: My right to fail versus your right to know
Susan Ballard, National Collaborative for Digital Equity
Moderated by Kristin Fontichiaro, University of Michigan School of Information
As individuals continue to engage in social media and eCommerce (and) the associations, organizations and government agencies with whom we interact collect and share information about us, personal data is available and discoverable on an increasingly easy basis. Anything from connecting with someone via an online dating service and wanting to know their “backstory,” to conducting a background check on a potential new hire or wondering if a DNA profile will match up with your quest for family information can lead to unintended consequences for the subject of the search. As the New Testament parable of The Mote and the Beam reminds us, in attending to the mote in our neighbor’s eye, do we need first to consider the beam in our own? Should we be worried about the past catching up with us, or have the right to obscure it? Does the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulations offer us some means of control? This webinar will explore theses thorny questions and propose some potential solutions on the horizon.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/U3TS9oYTXsdQTrUp2

2:45 – 3:45pm Eastern
Fantastic Statistics and How to Use Them: Data for School Newspaper Reporting
Tuvya Bergson-Michelson, student journalist, in conversation with Tasha Bergson-Michelson, Instructional and Programming Librarian, Castilleja School
Moderated by Lynette Hoelter, ICPSR
Student newspapers follow the same trends as other media outlets, and are striving to integrate statistics and use of data visualizations into their reporting. But how do we teach students to take the story they want to tell with data and make it appropriate for the audience they want to reach? As a politics writer and infographic designer for an award-winning high school paper, Tuvya Bergson-Michelson grapples with how to use data visualizations to make complex topics more accessible with meaningful data visualizations. On topics like gerrymandering, it turns out that the visualizations people think they want are not the best way to convey the information that needs to be explained. The job of the student journalist — or any student making an argument with data — is to lift back the curtain on the hard statistical thinking without making the thinking hard on the reader. Join us as we explore effective habits of mind students can adopt in their own writing and research.
Session Link: To Come
Evalaution Link: https://goo.gl/forms/yOQauP6WARaJmp6q2

4:00 – 5:00pm Eastern
Helping Students Ask Better Questions About Data
Connie Williams, National Board Certified Teacher Librarian
Moderated by Kristin Fontichiaro, University of Michigan School of Information
If we want high school students to engage effectively with data across the content areas, we need to help them learn how to interrogate the data they find. We also know that some students grow up encouraged to ask questions, while others learn that questioning is disrespectful. If we are committed to leveling the playing field for our students and building democratic citizenship, we need to cultivate students’ ability and confidence to ask effective questions, particularly when it comes to data. The Right Question Institute provides a powerful framework for guiding students toward developing better questioning skills that can help you bridge that gap. We’ll look at specific, practical strategies you can use to help you build sustainable skills in your students.
Session Link: To Come
Evaluation Link: https://goo.gl/forms/cBDyMCfQRE0rhaYE3